Using a Killer to Kill a Killer: Treating a Deadly Form of Brain Cancer with the Polio Virus

Recently, I watched a CBS Special on 60 minutes that I had to share! Researchers at Duke are experimenting with a reengineered polio virus to treat a deadly form of brain cancer called glioblastoma.  In my opinion, the journalism in this 60 minute special is done well by also including the grim reality that is associated with the unsuccessful side of clinical […]

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Obesity’s Influence on Prostate Cancer Risk for African American Men

For unknown reasons, African American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Yesterday, I read a fascinating study that identified obesity as playing a significant role in prostate cancer risk in African American men. In a study published just two days ago in JAMA Oncology, researchers Drs. Alan […]

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Selecting the ‘Right’ Hospital for You; Looking further than a ranking

One day  while studying for the MCAT at a Barnes and Noble, my eyes and ears were directed to a elderly couple sitting next to me engrossed in a magazine. As I peeked over, I noticed it was a US News & World Report: Best Hospitals 2015 edition magazine. For the hour I sat next […]

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Best approach to treat an aneurysm: Coil embolization or Clipping

Recently, I spent a lot of my time in the neuro-angio suite, a surgical room complemented with the technology to visualize blood vessels using a technique called angiography. For the past two months, I experienced the unique opportunity to observe a procedure that uses angiography called coil embolization. This procedure primarily treats cerebral aneurysms,  abnormal […]

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Targeted delivery using microcapsules to better treat intracranial tumors caused by metastases

Brain metastases is the spread of cancer from another location of the body to the brain. This is the most common form of intracranial tumors in adults. Treatment is typically palliative. However, for younger and more robust patients, an aggressive treatment plan consisting of maximal excision and  chemotherapy is attempted. Although prognosis is poor, the […]

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FDA announces one of the most important public health nutrition policies

The rhetoric to eat healthier foods and being cognizant of sugar, fats, GMO and antibiotic treated animals, as some examples, has permeated to millennials and their decisions on what they put into their bodies. To back this claim from a fiscal perspective, many fast food companies, like McDonalds, are reporting slower growth or even net […]

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Affordable Care Act already improving quality and decreasing cost, HHS finds

As I mentioned in my previous post on quality, the criteria used by the Department of Health and Human Services to measure quality since the implementation of the ACA are 30-day readmission rates, hospital acquired conditions and preventative deaths. The preliminary data presented by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) showed an overall […]

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Interesting Case: 24 year old woman born without cerebellum

I remember the very day I became fascinated with neuroscience. I was sent a video of Kim Peek, an individual born without a brain structure called the corpus callosum. The corpus callosum is a collection of neural fibers that connect the left and right cerebral hemispheres and facilitate interhemispheric communication. Agenesis of the corpus callosum […]

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Challenges with defining and measuring quality of healthcare

Why do I propose this discussion? Policy makers predicted that within the first decade of the Affordable Care Act, the law would increase cost, quality and most importantly access. So far, insuring the uninsured 32 million Americans  is coming to fruition and the obvious cost to do that through programs within the ACA are also apparent. […]

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Response to WSJ Article: Low Salt Diets May Pose Health Risk, Study Finds

After reading the article, I immediately thought of one of my earliest post on the association between BMI x Mortality , specifically the U shaped graph. Link here. The parabolic shaped graph explains the risk of mortality increases outside the healthy BMI range. Similarly, I believe that there is a certain range of values for […]

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